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With the number of traffic fatalities on the rise, San Francisco is quickly becoming one of the country's most dangerous cities to navigate on foot.

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The CDC's recent food-borne illness stats aren't just about science — there's politics involved, too. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Several universities throughout California have received sizeable grants for extensive study of stem cells.

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Doctors at some universities are still getting lucrative speaking gigs from Big Pharma, and more from our Daily Briefing.

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State medical boards are Ellis Islands for doctors. Doctors licensed in another state or fresh out of medical school have to pass muster with the board before being allowed to see patients in that state. If they have a history of problems in other states, the medical board can tell them to look for work elsewhere. One of the most common reasons states cite for disciplining a doctor, in Antidote’s experience, is discipline by another state.

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This week, Schorr talks with Career GPS about his sustainable model for getting in-depth health information to the people who need it and explains why you don't have to work for traditional media outlets to do good work.

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Bay Area school nutrition directors say higher nutrition standards are good, but expensive.

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How did William Hamman, the United Airlines pilot who faked being a cardiologist, get away with it? By speaking with authority and knowing that nobody was going to bother to fact-check his résumé, including the Wisconsin Medical Examining Board.

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Blue Cross of California awards $69 million in bonuses to in-state physican groups.

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Reporter's note:

One year ago from yesterday, 11-year-old Chandler Nash Elliott hung himself while his father was at work. We received a press release about the suicide over the fax. Like most news agencies, we do not report on suicides unless they are in a public place or the deceased is a public figure.

I told my colleagues -- and we all agreed -- that this would not make the news unless the family approached us, wanting to tell the boy's story.

The next morning, that's exactly what happened.

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