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Person Communication

Picture of Edwin Bender

Efforts by California health advocates to ban the sale of sugary sports drinks during the school day on middle and high school campuses were recently thwarted.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

Living with HIV or AIDS can be an unyielding source of stress that is not easily handled alone. It takes support, activism and a strong determination to not only survive, but thrive with a disease that takes a heavy mental, physical and emotional toll.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

When HIV/AIDS was thought of as a White, gay disease, it was often the suffering of Black patients that helped the world realize that it could affect anyone. Today, African-Americans remain the racial group most acutely affected by the epidemic.

Picture of Erica Mu

It’s difficult to deal with any kind of illness when it hits. But when it affects your emotional and psychological health, it’s often impossible to even describe.

Picture of Kate Long

A federally-funded health center, Cabin Creek Health Systems accepts patients whether they can pay or not. Freida Smith is one of their 14,000 patients.

Picture of William Heisel

The long held belief that we should not be allowed to buy or sell pieces of our own bodies is changing. What does that mean for the future of organ donation?

Picture of Greg Mellen

Having people open up about atrocities that would make a normal person blanch can be difficult under any circumstance. Hearing the stories in translation underscores the complexities of understanding the effects of trauma on people from utterly different cultures. 

Picture of Kate Long

For four hours, Bill Hall used to lie on a padded vinyl recliner, one arm stretched out, two thick needles sticking out of it. One needle drained the blood from his body. The other put it back.

Picture of Kate Long

Glenda has no insurance. She makes $350 every two weeks. If she were diabetic, she could get insulin free through the clinic if she needed it, but not the diabetic finger sticks and testing strips, which cost about $45. "I can't afford to get diabetes," she said.

Picture of Greg Mellen

For many refugees of the Cambodian genocide, the horrors didn't end when the shooting stopped. Nor did they end when the immigrants came to the United States in search of new lives.

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