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Picture of Linda Perez

The anti-immigrant sentiment that some Latinas in Georgia are experiencing has led some women to refrain from scheduling routine medical exams that could save their lives.

Picture of William Heisel

Why are state medical boards disciplining doctors by sending them to work in prisons? Why are some prison doctors with troubled histories kept away from patients - yet still collect their salaries? Learn how to report on these issues in your community.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Journalism program manager for Facebook Vadim Lavrusik shared a health story told via status updates in a Facebook journalism event in downtown Los Angeles last night.

Picture of Kate  Benson

Do death threats to an isolated few make for good journalism or just sensationalism? And in pursuing the unusual do journalists run the risk of skewing the overall situation? Does having one source on each side of the issue really provide accurate balance and meaningful context? Questions are easy, answers are harder.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Lori McComas Chaffins spent a decade battling an addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs before she decided to change her life.

Picture of Tracy Wood

Tracy Wood reports on why parks are so scarce in one half of California's Orange County, but not the other half.

Picture of William Heisel

It can be uncomfortable asking people about their finances. In journalism, though, there is an obligation not only to ask, but to ask for proof — especially with clinical trials.

Picture of William Heisel

Doctors and dentists are trying to restrict their patients' ability to rate them on consumer review sites such as Yelp and Angie’s List or even in personal emails. Here are five reporting tips from a doctors rating investigation by the Ars Technica blog.

Picture of Beatrice Motamedi

To a teen living in the rough areas of East Oakland, sorrow is no stranger. Random violence, worry about the future and a constant battle for basics such as healthy food or good schools add up to a kind of life that can make an East Oakland teen far older than his or her chronological age.

Picture of Bob Butler

Devaugndre Broussard grew up in three violent neighborhoods: San Francisco's Bayview-Hunter's Point and Western Addition and Richmond's Iron Triangle. His mother went to prison for drug sales when he was only 10 months old. She went back to prison several times while he grew up, sending him to a series of foster homes. A girlfriend who attended some of Broussard's early court appearances told the Chauncey Bailey Project this might've set the tone for his life. He's one of many people she knows who lived in foster homes where "parents" were more interested in the monthly county check than in their foster kids.

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

The best journalism these days wraps compelling narratives around scrupulous data analysis. Apply now for our 2021 Data Fellowship to learn the skills necessary to use big data to inform your reporting on health and social welfare issues. Learn more in this webinar on Aug. 3.

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