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The National Library of Medicine plans an exhibit of Native American healing practices this fall. In preparation, its physician-director met and questioned nine renowned Indian medicine men in Bismark, ND, a rare encounter.

Picture of William Heisel

Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

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What's being done to prevent suicide among Latino teens in Georgia? Linda Perez investigates for MundoHispanico.

Picture of William Heisel

A war of words has erupted at the University of Minnesota campus over bioethics writer and UM professor Carl Elliott’s reporting into the suicide of a schizophrenic patient enrolled in a clinical trial.

Picture of William Heisel

The new filing by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency against Dr. Scott Bickman for his role in a California painkiller mill reveals a very sad truth. Maria Garcia’s death could almost certainly have been avoided.

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Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

Del Norte County has a serious problem with tooth decay. In fact, the problem is spread across California — a recent study found that two-thirds of the state’s children have some form of tooth decay. Kelley Atherton finds out why.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

San Francisco's City Clinic has been dishing out frank talk about sex for 100 years. The shocking thing is not how much things have changed, but how much they haven't.

Picture of Daniela  Velazquez

At 364 pounds, Dawn Walton found her breaking point, literally, when she sat down for a meet and greet at her son's kindergarten class. "I felt the chair start to break beneath me," Walton, 35, said. "I knew it would kill him if I broke that chair." She made a bargain with God that day: If the seat didn't break, she'd change her lifestyle for good.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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