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pharmaceutical industry

Picture of Katherine  Eban

Some years ago, I began hearing from my sources that I should investigate the generic drug industry. A generic drug boom was underway and it had led to a gold-rush mentality, they said. There seemed no good way into this nebulous topic, and no way to assess the actual quality of U.S. generic drugs.

Picture of Susan  Abram

The makers of popular drugs like Advair, Cymbalta, Viagra and Zoloft have physicians, psychiatrists, and medical school faculty members across California on their payrolls. Does this influence prescribing patterns?

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Researching, writing and submitting papers to medical journals--and reworking and finessing them if accepted--is a demanding, time consuming job which drug companies have made into pay dirt.

Picture of William Heisel

Bob Pack had some interesting ideas for how to improve California’s prescription drug tracking system (CURES). Most of them remain just that: interesting ideas.

Picture of Patrick  Mustain

Dear Consumers: A disturbing trend has come to our attention. You, the people, are thinking more about health, and you’re starting to do something about it. This cannot continue.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

"Animal Pharma," the animal-drug divisions within drug companies, tends to operate under the public's radar.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

The Guardian newspaper follows the saga of Liz Fowler, healthcare lobbyist extraordinaire, who recently left the White House for a senior level position leading global health policy at Johnson & Johnson’s government affairs and policy group.

Picture of Carolyn Thomas

I thought online patient engagement communities were by patients, for patients. I was wrong: many of them are corporate data mining engines looking for your most personal medical information.

Picture of The Reporting on Health Collaborative

Scientists researching a vaccine for valley fever take different scientific approaches to their work. Some have been stymied by a lack of funding for their work.

Picture of The Reporting on Health Collaborative

There are arguments for developing a valley fever vaccine, but it can’t happen without a breakthrough in research — or more public funding.

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