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pharmaceutical sciences

Picture of Katherine  Eban

Some years ago, I began hearing from my sources that I should investigate the generic drug industry. A generic drug boom was underway and it had led to a gold-rush mentality, they said. There seemed no good way into this nebulous topic, and no way to assess the actual quality of U.S. generic drugs.

Picture of Susan  Abram

The makers of popular drugs like Advair, Cymbalta, Viagra and Zoloft have physicians, psychiatrists, and medical school faculty members across California on their payrolls. Does this influence prescribing patterns?

Picture of William Heisel

Bob Pack had some interesting ideas for how to improve California’s prescription drug tracking system (CURES). Most of them remain just that: interesting ideas.

Picture of William Heisel

A grieving father set out to create a system that might prevent other lives from being lost at the hands of a drug-dazed driver. Ten years later, he's still waiting for the system he created to be fully realized.

Picture of William Heisel

A new company aims to clean up the FDA's messy data for reporting drug adverse events and market it to pharma and other businesses. Health reporters can benefit from the company's work, too.

Picture of Andrew Holtz

Normally I would salivate over a workshop titled "Let Me Be Clear: Science Journalism in the Age of the Genome and Twitter." But then my building excitement and anticipation was doused by a real buzz kill in the middle of the sponsor logos.

Picture of Manoj Jain

About a decade ago when I was newly settled into private practice in Memphis, a representative for a drug company marketing a new and powerful antibiotic stood in my office and asked whether I would like to attend a consultants' meeting about the drug in Washington.

Picture of William Heisel

It can be uncomfortable asking people about their finances. In journalism, though, there is an obligation not only to ask, but to ask for proof — especially with clinical trials.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug costs continue to climb for West Virginia, despite efforts to rein them in.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

If you've experienced sticker shock at the pharmacy and wondered why drug prices are always rising, even for generics, consider the value of salt. Baxter International, which sells drugs to health care providers and pharmacies, billed Medicaid $928 for $1.71 worth of saline solution -- a 54,000% markup -- for more than 10 years before a Louisiana state lawsuit caught the deception...

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