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Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Many professions have their version of a post-event analysis of what went wrong, and how to prevent it. The autopsy report is medicine's. Journalists can find a trove of stories in a review of death certificates.

Picture of William Heisel

William Heisel interviews health writer Liz Scherer about the latest coverage of the Women's Health Initiative study on hormone replacement therapy and her tips for covering women's health.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

In today's hyper-evolving social media world, it might seem quaint, if not downright foolish, to believe that old school journalism's low-tech and low-cost approaches — a pen, a pad, and shoe-leather investigation — could result in an article that ignites a global furor.

 

Picture of Hillary Meeks

Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

Picture of William Heisel

The idea of telling health care workers they should not wear their scrubs outside the hospital lit up the social media world this week. Dr. David C. Martin, a retired Sacramento anesthesiologist who abhors the too-casual practice of scrubs on the street, has hit a nerve.

Picture of William Heisel

You probably have been to a restaurant near a hospital and seen a doctor, nurse or medical assistant wearing scrubs and standing in line for a sandwich. You probably didn’t give this a second thought, but Dr. David C. Martin thinks you should be alarmed.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 15 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

How will health care reform impact Gary and its citizens?

While the Republican-dominated U.S. House of Representatives voted to repeal the Accountable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. Senate isn’t likely to follow suit, meaning the landmark health reform legislation will continue to change the way many Americans receive health care.

Picture of Angilee Shah

A selection from the weekend, long and short reads, and a video in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Some lawmakers say they're disappointed that Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin slashed funding to fight substance abuse and to improve end-of-life health care.

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