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Portsmouth

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When it comes to health issues, the southeastern corner of Virginia usually is pretty average. That’s why I was surprised to discover a report that showed a city in my readership area has the highest cancer mortality rate in the state.

Picture of Amy Hansen

When it comes to health issues, the southeastern corner of Virginia usually is pretty average. That’s why I was surprised to discover a report that showed a city in my readership area has the highest cancer mortality rate in the state.

Picture of Amy Hansen

High cancer mortality rates in Portsmouth, Va., might be linked to a variety of factors related to race, socioeconomics, culture and possibly even biology.

Picture of Amy Hansen

In Portsmouth, Va., where people die of cancer at the highest rate in the state, recent surveys indicate that residents are pretty good about getting screenings for colorectal cancer. They're also among the best in the state for getting mammograms, despite having only two places to go in the city.

Picture of Amy Hansen

In the first part of her three-part series for The Virginian-Pilot, 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow Amy Jeter reports on why people in Portsmouth, VA, are more likely to die of cancer than people elsewhere in the state.

Picture of Amy Hansen

South Hampton Roads, a metropolitan area of about 1.1 million people in southeastern Virginia, is comprised of five disparate cities: two urban, two suburban, and one rural.

Picture of Elizabeth Simpson

Two communities, one urban, one rural, trying to improve the health of residents

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