Skip to main content.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Picture of Jane Stevens

Project Unbreakable is a powerful combination of social media, photography and storytelling. But Grace Brown calls it "art therapy" for those who need to heal.

Picture of Beatrice Motamedi

To a teen living in the rough areas of East Oakland, sorrow is no stranger. Random violence, worry about the future and a constant battle for basics such as healthy food or good schools add up to a kind of life that can make an East Oakland teen far older than his or her chronological age.

Picture of Bob Butler

Devaugndre Broussard grew up in three violent neighborhoods: San Francisco's Bayview-Hunter's Point and Western Addition and Richmond's Iron Triangle. His mother went to prison for drug sales when he was only 10 months old. She went back to prison several times while he grew up, sending him to a series of foster homes. A girlfriend who attended some of Broussard's early court appearances told the Chauncey Bailey Project this might've set the tone for his life. He's one of many people she knows who lived in foster homes where "parents" were more interested in the monthly county check than in their foster kids.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

There’s a growing recognition of the role that complex post-traumatic stress disorder plays in trapping people in long-term homelessness. Understanding how PTSD unfolds can help us better understand the homeless and their health issues.

Picture of Kimber Solana

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today in the Daily Briefing we're reading about conflicts of interest, Google Health and wars that don't end at home.

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

This post describes the Dart Society reunion I attended last month. Named after eminent psychiatrist Dr. Frank Ochberg, he fellows supports journalists who cover issues of trauma and violence to help them both tells stories about those issues with sensitivity and compassion and to deal with the emotional consequences of doing that work.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A "show-me-the-evidence" health journalist offers tips on covering alternative medicine without dismissing all of it out of hand.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Murray B. Stein is a professor of psychiatry and family and preventive medicine at UCSD and director of the Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program at UCSD and at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. His research interests include the neurobiology, epidemiology and treatment of anxiety disorders including social phobia, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Pages

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth