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pregnancy

Picture of Amber Dance
Also, pandemic stimulus funds miss many vulnerable Americans, and a fresh focus on COVID-created pregnancy complications.
Picture of Nada Hassanein
More than 2 million women live in counties with no birth center or other obstetric care. A ban on abortion could mean greater health risks for them.
Picture of Kassie McClung
A growing number of women are facing criminal charges for substance use during pregnancy in Oklahoma. Experts and health care providers say that’s bad for moms and babies.
Picture of Taylor Walker
Moms talk about what it’s like to be pregnant in jail, and about their lives before and after incarceration.
Picture of Kassie McClung
Black Oklahomans are 50% more likely than white Oklahomans to die from maternity-related complications. Black babies in Oklahoma are almost 2.5 times more likely than white babies to die before their first birthday.
Picture of Kassie McClung
While progress to address poor birth outcomes among Black Oklahomans has been slow, women are taking action themselves.
Picture of Taylor Walker
In the third part of this multi-part series, we look at some of the ways in which the process of diversion can jump the rails.
Picture of Sonja Sharp
Disabled people get pregnant and give birth at the same rates as nondisabled ones. But their outcomes are often far worse, and modern medicine has largely turned its back on them.
Picture of Taylor Walker
In the second part of this multi-part series, we explore, step-by-step, the process for diverting pregnant people out of LA County’s women’s jail, moving them into housing and toward independence.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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