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premature birth

Picture of Chinyere Amobi
Priska Neely, managing editor of Gulf States Newsroom, and Cheryl Giscombe, a distinguished professor at UNC Chapel Hill, shine new light on a decades-old disparity.
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This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. Other stories in the series include:   Black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. My family is part of this statistic   America's black babies are pay
Picture of Monica McLemore
There is nothing inherent about black skin that increases risks during pregnancy — except over-exposure to the real culprit, racism, which can harm a mother’s body in real, measurable ways.
Picture of Giles Bruce
For reporter Giles Bruce, it wasn't until he jettisoned all his preconceived notions about what was driving Indiana's high infant death rate that he found his real story.
Picture of Jenny Gold

More and more, doctors like are looking to parents to help make difficult decisions on how much treatment to give babies born very sick and premature, as well as figuring out when it's time to let them go. There's now more emphasis on parents' values and preferences in such cases.

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Anne and Omar Shamiyeh first learned something was wrong with one of their twins during an ultrasound, when Anne was 18 weeks pregnant. "The technician was, like, 'Well, there's no visualization of his stomach,'" Anne recounted. "And I was like, 'How does our baby have no stomach?'"

Picture of Thomas Corwin

Cornelius James Evans had just turned 18 when he died, before his mother could establish formal legal guardianship, and the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities is now using that to deny her a copy of its investigation into his death.

Picture of Thomas Corwin

The state has not put a good system in place to support developmentally disabled patients moved from state facilities into community care, and it’s unclear if it is following recommendations to better investigate patient deaths, according to an independent monitor.

Picture of Thomas Corwin

What began as two Georgia mental health patients seeking community care has become a national crusade by the U.S. Department of Justice to move patients out of state facilities and into community care, with what some say are fatal consequences.

Picture of Thomas Corwin

Christen Shermaine Hope Gordon was one of 500 patients in 2013 who died in community care while under the auspices of the Geor­gia Dept. of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities. While the community placements were halted, parents are worried over state plans to resume the program.

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