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prenatal care

Picture of William Heisel
How can you find out if hospitals or health centers near you are doing enough to ensure good maternal health? Start by pretending you are a first-time mother in crisis.
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being....
Picture of Priska Neely
KPCC’s Priska Neely reports on one of the reasons it has been so hard to bring down the black infant mortality rate: systemic racism is at the heart of the issue.
Picture of Priska Neely
It's one thing to identify the complex social cause of this crisis. It's far harder to combat racism and stop more babies from dying.
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being....
Picture of Priska Neely
Reporter Priska Neely talks to her sister Nicole to talk about the two babies she lost nearly 20 years ago, after going into premature labor both times.
Picture of Monica McLemore
There is nothing inherent about black skin that increases risks during pregnancy — except over-exposure to the real culprit, racism, which can harm a mother’s body in real, measurable ways.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
Christin Farmer knew she wanted to help women have babies at 16, when she watched an episode of TLC's "A Baby Story" and saw a midwife with a birthing center delivering babies.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
Birth attendants can positively affect outcomes for mothers and infants. But access to them is often out of reach for low-income and minority women, who have the highest rates of infant and maternal mortality.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Research has shown that sex education results in fewer teen pregnancies, but in California's politically conservative San Joaquin Valley, there is a history of strong push-back against sex ed.

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The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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