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prevention

Picture of Suzanne Bohan
The Neighborhood Atlas gives journalists an intriguing new tool to visualize how social advantages vary across cities and regions.
Picture of Priska Neely
The Castlemont neighborhood in East Oakland is known as a Best Babies Zone. The idea of this initiative is that improving life for everyone in the community will ultimately save babies.
Picture of Teresa Sforza
Parental drug use is now responsible for one-third of the children in foster care. A reporting team will explore what happens to babies and parents caught in addiction's grip.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
In East St. Louis, the school district is helping parents get back on their feet.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Locals are the first to acknowledge that pouring more money into the city isn’t the only answer.
Picture of Steve Mencher
Local politicians have long tried to find ways to better serve residents of this poorer, unincorporated section of Sonoma. Two reporters are now asking whether annexation can improve health.
Picture of Jill Replogle
It was a vexing data riddle: Were opioids leading seniors to commit suicide? Or did they have major health problems that led them to take their lives?
Picture of Judith Mernit
Syringe exchanges and overdose kits aren’t always reaching poor and rural Californians, but advocates of the harm reducation approach are trying to make that happen.
Picture of Kate Howard
When a youth is accused of a crime in Kentucky, an adult has to make a choice in nearly every step that follows. And a disproportionate number of the youth denied a second chance are black.
Picture of Priska Neely
Reporter Priska Neely talks to her sister Nicole to talk about the two babies she lost nearly 20 years ago, after going into premature labor both times.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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