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primary care

Picture of Niharika Sathe
A doctor who cares for underserved patients finds her efforts are often rendered useless by systemic barriers to care.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The bill gained momentum as the pandemic put a spotlight on health care disparities and workforce shortages.
Picture of Luanne Rife
This story was reported with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“There’s real hope that help is on the way,” health workforce researcher Edward Salsberg said.
Picture of Susan  Abram
At one of the busiest public hospitals in the nation, doctors are making a big push to better address the underlying forces shaping health.
Picture of Susan  Abram
One solution to allay the high numbers may be a pilot project the Los Angeles County Fire Department is trying out: a “health care on wheels.”
Picture of Katharine Gammon
At LAC+USC Medical Center, primary care doctors now routinely ask patients about things such as food, housing and mental health, with teams of providers ready to connect them to services.
Picture of Vicki Gonzalez
Juan was homeless and struggling with alcoholism before a team of health care providers at LAC+USC were finally able to put him on a new path. It's part of a new approach to treating the whole patient at the county's largest hospital.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
Whether it's screening for developmental problems or catching adverse childhood experiences early, some doctors want to make the pediatrician's office a one-stop shop.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
One of the busiest free clinics in the state of North Carolina closed its doors in 2016. A reporter decided to find out what that meant for the health of the county's disproportionately poor residents.

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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