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Ted Corbin is an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Drexel University College of Medicine and co-director of the Center for Nonviolence & Social Justice there. He also serves as the medical director for the center's Healing Hurt People program, an emergency department-based intervention strategy for victims of intentional injury. Dr. Corbin received his master’s degree in public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

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A special report to The Filipino Press

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Robert J. Davis, Ph.D., M.P.H., has 20 years' experience as a health and medical journalist. Currently, he serves as president and editor-in-chief of Everwell, a company that creates and distributes consumer health video content. Previously, he was executive producer of the award-winning PBS series "HealthWeek," executive editor for Time Life Medical, and a producer for CNN medical news.

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Dr. Myers is the former Director for the Department of Health and Human Service's National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and has an appointment at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) as the Sealy Center for Vaccine Development's (SCVD) Associate Director for Public Health Policy and Education. Vaccine policy issues that Dr. Myers and the SCVD address are assessing the safety and benefits of new and experimental vaccines and barriers that keep people from getting the vaccines they need.

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Dr. Laurence Baker is an associate professor of health research and policy, and a fellow with the Center for Health Policy (CHP) and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR) at Stanford University. He is an economist interested in the organization and economic performance of the U.S. healthcare system. His research focuses on the effects of managed care on the healthcare system, the effects of regulation on healthcare markets, the determinants and effects of technological change in medicine, the culture of patient safety in U.S.

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Kimberly Belshé was appointed secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in November 2003. Belshé is a member of the governor's cabinet and serves as his chief advisor on health, social services and rehabilitative policies. Belshé manages an agency of almost 33,000 employees, with a total state budget of about $70 billion. The agency oversees 11 state departments and one board that are responsible for providing Californians with health, developmental, mental, rehabilitative, social and other critical services.

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Dr. Herman A. Taylor Jr. is director and principal investigator of the Jackson Heart Study, the largest-ever, population-based study of heart disease and related disorders among African-Americans. In his capacity as director of the Mississippi-based study since 1998, he holds appointments at Jackson State University, Tougaloo College, and the University of Mississippi Medical Center. He also holds the medical center's Aaron Shirley Chair for the Study of Health Disparities.

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David C. Warner is the Wilbur J. Cohen Fellow in Health and Social Policy at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and a professor of public affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He also is a visiting professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. His major teaching and research interests are in economics, health policy and health finance. He formerly taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was deputy director of the Office of Program Analysis of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

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Dr. Kammen brings to the analysis of national and international energy policy an understanding of the technology as well as of the economics and the policy landscape. He sees value in greater emphasis on renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power and biomass, not only because it is better for the environment, but also because it would improve our nation's security by lessening reliance on imported oil. Renewables also would produce more jobs than an equivalent investment in fossil fuel energy sources, according to a recent study by Kammen.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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