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prison health

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

Nearly a quarter of HIV+ Americans will be incarcerated at some point each year. For some it will be the first time they learn of their status. For others, it will be the first time they receive treatment for HIV. Unfortunately, when they're released, 90 percent experience interruptions in care.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

Looking for fresh story ideas? We hope these accounts of how reporters across the country got the stories, sources and subjects give you fodder for covering your own communities in a new way.

Picture of Micky Duxbury

An estimated 297,000 children have a parent in a CA state prison or county jail. One former inmate vividly recalls the trauma of her then 5-year-old daughter witnessing one of her many arrests as the girl grabbed the officer's pants and cried, "Please don’t take my mommy away."

Picture of Micky Duxbury

Crime experts try to determine what does and doesn’t work in changing the behavior of the formerly incarcerated.

Picture of Micky Duxbury

Can role models improve an ex-con's chances of success? One former prisoner said he attended substance abuse and anger management classes, but that changing his idea of manhood made the biggest difference in being able to quit crime.

Picture of Micky Duxbury

Alameda County California has put together a comprehensive re-entry program to help ex-offenders surmount common hurdles. And for some, reentry requires adjustment to a shifting social landscape that bears little resemblance to the world one left behind.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Tamiflu woes, obesity at a standstill, appendicitis mysteries and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A recent Detroit Free Press column illustrates what happens when you cut mental health services in a community: jails become the new mental hospitals. Unsurprisingly, they’re not very good ones.

Picture of William Heisel

Should doctors be checked for competence as they age, as elderly drivers are? A negligence case involving a 75-year-old obstetrician raises some tough questions.

Picture of Angilee Shah

How can mainstream media better cover communities, particularly those that don't often have a voice? Increasingly, public radio reporters are using the Public Insight Network, a mashup of Rolodex and crowdsourcing machine.

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