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Psychiatry

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The label on the malaria drug, developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in the 1970s after another malaria drug used in Vietnam failed, warns of psychosis, hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, aggression, tremors, confusion, abnormal dreams and suicide. The drug still prescribed to US

Picture of Kate  Benson

The psychiatric world is close to receiving an updated version of their “Bible.” Officially known as the DSM 5 this tome, published by the Association of Psychiatrists, under goes revision every couple of decades often accompanied by contentious issues and rancor.

Picture of William Heisel

One psychiatrist believes he was just one of many physicians with restricted medical licenses who take jobs that other doctors don’t want, often dealing with vulnerable populations.

Picture of William Heisel

How does a doctor become a top prescriber of a psychiatric drug in one state’s Medicaid program? A "stunned" California psychiatrist tries to figure out why.

Picture of Jocelyn Wiener

As mental health budgets shrink and services erode in Stanislaus County California, Aspen Family Medical Group, a primary care clinic, has taken on a key role in treating the county's uninsured mentally ill.

Picture of Jocelyn Wiener

Richard Curtis' schizophrenic son was rejected repeatedly from Social Security, which would allow him to qualify for Medi-Cal and more extensive county services.

Picture of Jocelyn Wiener

Deputy David Frost, who oversees a California county jail’s two mental health wings, said it’s not uncommon for seriously ill inmates to wait there for months, even after a judge orders them transferred to a state hospital.

Picture of William Heisel

The controversy over revisions to psychiatry's bible, the DSM, isn't just about autism. Guest blogger Mary Schweitzer throws chronic fatigue syndrome into the mix.

Picture of Victoria  Costello

An opinion piece, borne of personal experience and a decade of mental health reporting, arguing in favor of many proposed changes to the DSM-5 that would allow early intervention for common mental disorders.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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