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public health

Picture of Byard Duncan
Reveal’s Byard Duncan shares some tips from his recent investigation into the spike in foster care placements in states hit hardest by the opioid crisis.
Picture of Harold Pierce
Advocates for valley fever research give California Assemblyman Rudy Salas an “A” for effort for the "most robust" legislative effort to address the disease in state history. But public health officials and experts are split on whether the remedies proposed by Salas will bring improvements.
Picture of Rusha Modi
"The reality is that many medical students, residents and trainee physicians are illiterate in the basics of public health and health policy," says Dr. Rusha Modi.
Picture of Taylor Walsh
UC Irvine recently announced a $200 million gift to establish a new college of integrative medicine. The press coverage revealed a long-running bias from the media toward alternative therapies, one supporter argues.
Picture of Jill Replogle
Orange County has the second highest number of opioid-related deaths in the state after Los Angeles, and the epidemic is hitting hardest among people in their golden years.
Picture of Joe Rubin
Are California regulators in denial about the dangers of lead? The state's response to previous lead-poisoning crises raise plenty of doubts.
Picture of Sarah Gustavus
Chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes, are a longstanding public health concern in many tribal communities in the Southwest. Sarah Gustavus and Antonia Gonzales examine how some individuals have overcome those challenges and are now sharing information and resources.
Picture of Linda Marsa
Houstonians may experience a public health crisis many orders of magnitude worse than the aftermath of other major storms.
Picture of Andy Krackov
From my vantage point as a former journalist who much admires what reporters can contribute, journalists can play a more activist role and in so doing help improve the health of the communities in which they live and work.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
City heat is a growing public health threat. It kills 60 to 70 Angelenos every summer. Even though heat causes more deaths and medical problems than most other natural disasters, it’s rarely identified as the culprit.

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