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public transportation

Picture of Carly Graf
‘You’re really a second-class citizen’ if you live in this neighborhood.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
Rebuilding is expensive and draining for anyone caught in the path of a major storm. That's why such events tend to make existing disparities even worse.
Picture of Lois Collins

Studies have linked loneliness and social isolation to an array of potentially devastating health challenges, including Alzheimer’s and other neurologically degenerative conditions, diabetes, overweight and obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease.

Picture of Taunya English

Health impact assessments (HIAs) are behind an emerging idea that public transportation — or even a state park — can be part of a prescription for good health.

Picture of Erica Mu

"Inside Out" is a public radio series that will begin a conversation about the mental health of Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). These radio and multimedia stories examine the experience and understanding of mental health from the perspective of several Bay Area residents of differing AAPI ethnicities. They reveal barriers to care, like...

Picture of Rachel  Dovey

In the state's wealthiest county, an aging community struggles to get around—and get by.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Healthy food is in short supply in communities of color

Picture of Rachel  Dovey

Residents in the small town of Novato, Calif., are aging quickly and their slow-growth community may not be keeping up. For my project, I will examine what it will take to accomodate the changing demographics, and question whether a significant--and growing--population is being ignored in the state's wealthiest county.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

Picture of Emily Ramshaw

Living without running water, sanitation services or paved roads, people living in Texas colonias face grim health risks, Hunt Grant recipient Emily Ramshaw reports for the Texas Tribune/New York Times.

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