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Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
As schools have returned to in-person instruction, advocates for children say they’re starting to see an uptick in juvenile justice complaints. We look at how diversion works in other countries.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
Juvenile justice advocates see a disproportionate number of children with reading disabilities. The pandemic shed a light on those inequities.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
School-based juvenile justice complaints decreased when children were not in school during the pandemic, but what about now?
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
When schools shut down at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, juvenile delinquency complaints decreased. Here’s what it means — and what it doesn’t.
Picture of Kristi Coale
We should know in a few months how many people are living on our streets, but that’s just a start.
Picture of Josh Hinkle
In recent years, there have been efforts to increase other competency restoration alternatives – like jail-based or outpatient methods – but for some people, those options are not always available.
Picture of David Barer
An examination of shortfalls in Texas' oversight of the state hospital waitlist spotlights unreliable data and records that aren’t kept, like the race and ethnicity of people on the waitlist and how many die each year before getting to the hospital.
Picture of David Barer
By October 2021, the number of people stuck in jail waiting for a state hospital bed had grown to a new record of 1,838 people.
Picture of David Barer
In Texas, those charged with crimes and found mentally incompetent are entitled to treatment at a state hospital before returning to jail and standing trial. The failing system waitlists hundreds. Sometimes they die sooner than receiving treatment.
Picture of Stephen Simpson
"There used to be a time when license plates had numbers on it for each county based on population and Pulaski County was one and Jefferson County and Mississippi County were two and three."

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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