Skip to main content.

radiation

Picture of Sara Israelsen-Hartley
How Utah’s hands-off approach to radon is putting people at risk.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Native organizations and advocates across the United States are seeking to get young Native people to switch from drinking sugary beverages, such as soda and energy drinks, to water.
Picture of William Heisel

To understand the nature of a threat like buried radiation in a park, it helps to pause for a minute and think about the sacred values of the people feeling threatened. Part of the threat is psychological and should not be dismissed.

Picture of William Heisel

Suppose you arrive at work only to be told by your editor that today you're writing about a questionable new study claiming that radiation from the nuclear meltdown in Japan is causing thyroid disorders in U.S. babies. How should you proceed?

Picture of William Heisel

When an online news service wrote a story about potential health effects in the U.S. from the nuclear meltdown in Japan, people were frightened. The article was an act of fearmongering that could've been easily avoided.

Picture of William Heisel

The question-mark headline is one way publications evoke claims that might not be supported by the evidence. Consider the alarmist reporting on studies that claimed post-tsunami nuclear fallout from Japan has sickened U.S. babies.

Picture of William Heisel

Health writers can help readers understand that less treatment sometimes makes the most sense.

Picture of James Salwitz

What if you could take one pill and live 10 years longer? What if that pill also made you bald? What if the pill made you bald and nauseous? What if that one pill made you bald, nauseous, dizzy, impotent, and blind?  Would you take that pill? 

Pages

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth