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radiation

Picture of Sara Israelsen-Hartley
How Utah’s hands-off approach to radon is putting people at risk.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Native organizations and advocates across the United States are seeking to get young Native people to switch from drinking sugary beverages, such as soda and energy drinks, to water.
Picture of William Heisel

To understand the nature of a threat like buried radiation in a park, it helps to pause for a minute and think about the sacred values of the people feeling threatened. Part of the threat is psychological and should not be dismissed.

Picture of William Heisel

Suppose you arrive at work only to be told by your editor that today you're writing about a questionable new study claiming that radiation from the nuclear meltdown in Japan is causing thyroid disorders in U.S. babies. How should you proceed?

Picture of William Heisel

When an online news service wrote a story about potential health effects in the U.S. from the nuclear meltdown in Japan, people were frightened. The article was an act of fearmongering that could've been easily avoided.

Picture of William Heisel

The question-mark headline is one way publications evoke claims that might not be supported by the evidence. Consider the alarmist reporting on studies that claimed post-tsunami nuclear fallout from Japan has sickened U.S. babies.

Picture of William Heisel

Health writers can help readers understand that less treatment sometimes makes the most sense.

Picture of James Salwitz

What if you could take one pill and live 10 years longer? What if that pill also made you bald? What if the pill made you bald and nauseous? What if that one pill made you bald, nauseous, dizzy, impotent, and blind?  Would you take that pill? 

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Announcements

The Center for Health Journalism’s 2023 National Fellowship will provide $2,000 to $10,000 reporting grants, five months of mentoring from a veteran journalist, and a week of intensive training at USC Annenberg in Los Angeles from July 16-20. Click here for more information and the application form, due May 5.

The Center for Health Journalism’s 2023 Symposium on Domestic Violence provides reporters with a roadmap for covering this public health epidemic with nuance and sensitivity. The next session will be offered virtually on Friday, March 31. Journalists attending the symposium will be eligible to apply for a reporting grant of $2,000 to $10,000 from our Domestic Violence Impact Reporting Fund. Find more info here!

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