Skip to main content.

radiation

Picture of William Heisel

The Wall Street Journal’s series on Medicare costs, “Secrets of the System,” sets the mind spinning with possibilities for future health investigations. I culled five tips from the on Wednesday. Here are five more. Next week, I will offer a few story ideas that could grow out of the Journal’s efforts to crack open the Medicare claims database for everyone.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

About three years ago, Georgina González left her three siblings, three children, and three grandchildren in Puebla, México and immigrated to Fresno in search of better economic opportunities.
What she found here, though, was an opportunity to receive health care after she was diagnosed with breast

Picture of William Heisel

For the past two years, New York Times reporter Walt Bogdanich has written more about medical radiation than most reporters will in their entire careers. He has examined it from every possible angle, focusing on both the power and the peril of various radiation treatments.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Radiation Worries: As if you didn’t have enough to worry about with all the controversy over whole-body airport security scanners, the New York Times’ Walt Bogdanich and Jo Craven McGinty examine possible radiation risks for children and teens in the wake of lucrative dental diagnostic technologies both old and new.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Gimme Insurance: Writing in the Columbia Journalism Review, Trudy Lieberman examines the astonishing case of a newly elected doctor-Congressman who was irked because his new health insurance didn’t start on the very first day of his new job. Welcome to the rest of America, Rep. Andy Harris.

Picture of

Yesterday, the humor website Cracked.com published a list of 5 common medical procedures that, in its opinion, aren’t worth it. They are CT scans, physical examinations, circumcisions, Cesarean sections and antibiotics. OK, antibiotics are not really procedures, but you get the point. Of course, the author uses exaggeration to bolster his case but there is a lot of truth in the article. Let’s take them one by one.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

What we’re reading and listening to today:

Snail spit: This could be the best trade headline of the year: Non-addictive Painkiller Made From Snail Spit Now Comes in a Pill.

Picture of William Heisel

Have you ever gone in for an oil change and left with the suspicion that the mechanics didn’t do anything beyond opening your hood?

Anemona Hartocollis at The New York Times has exposed this same type of behavior in a much more critical venue: a local hospital. She wrote:

Picture of Peter Lipson

When I was a kid, my parents gave me an Isaac Asimov book.  I don't remember which one, but it was non-fiction, and his way of engaging the reader directly immediately drew me in.  Several years later I found the works of Stephen Jay Gould.  I dug up every book of his I could find and ended up getting the hardcover of each new collection as it was published.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth