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Dr. Richard J. Jackson is a professor and the chairman of environmental health sciences at UCLA's School of Public Health. Previously, he was an adjunct professor of environmental health services at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. He also served as state public health officer for the California Department of Health Services. His responsibilities included direct leadership and oversight of the department's public health-related activities.

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Dr. Michael K. Gould graduated from Cornell University in 1983 with honors in all subjects. He received his medical degree from the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center at Syracuse, and completed residency and chief residency training in internal medicine, also at SUNY Syracuse. He trained as a clinical fellow in pulmonary and critical care medicine at Stanford University Medical Center. He then completed a research fellowship in Health Services and Health Policy at Stanford University. He received an M.S. degree in health services research in 1998. Dr.

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Carolyn C. Drake is dean of instruction for the health sciences division of Fresno City College. The health sciences division offers courses for fulfilling requirements in a number of occupational programs directly in the health sciences, as well as in physical education and recreation leadership. The program offers students the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Radiation Therapy or a Certificate in Nuclear Medicine from Loma Linda University on the Fresno City College campus.

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Dr. Beate Ritz is a professor in the department of epidemiology and environmental health at the UCLA School of Public Health, and in the department of neurology at the UCLA Geffen School of Medicine. Ritz is also a member of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, the NIEHS-UCLA-USC Environmental Health Science Center, and a participant in the UCLA EPA-Particle Center effort. She is the co-director of the NIEHS-funded UCLA Center for Gene-Environment Studies in Parkinson's Disease.

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In 2002, health care costs, particularly for cancer treatments, were soaring for seniors in some Medicare HMOs. After negative publicity about one HMO's drastic increase in chemotherapy copayments, the HMO agreed to reduce the cost to make it more affordable for patients.

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