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rehabilitation

Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Cristian Fernandez was propelled to international notoriety when he was just 12, when he fatally beat his 2-year-old brother. But, after seven years of incarceration, how does a 19-year-old begin to move on?
Picture of Marc Lester

Every day, outreach workers try to lift homeless alcoholics from the streets of Anchorage, Alaska. In the past, a sober life has always been the goal. But a controversial approach called Housing First is challenging that thinking. Last story in a four-part series.

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President Obama could use his executive powers to promote rehabilitation instead of prison, and stop the record numbers of arrests and deportations of undocumented immigrants.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Hollywood stars, like Glee’s Cory Monteith, aren’t the only Americans struggling with addiction that kills. Monteith, who died of a heroin and alcohol overdose earlier this month, exemplifies the public health tragedy that is opioid overdose deaths in America.

Picture of Micky Duxbury

Crime experts try to determine what does and doesn’t work in changing the behavior of the formerly incarcerated.

Picture of Katharine Mieszkowski

Last year, the California started releasing medically-incapacitated felons into nursing homes under a new program called medical parole. But which nursing homes are taking these patients?

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Gabrielle Giffords’ resignation from Congress is a poignant reminder that for traumatic brain injury patients, the medical story doesn’t end when the media glare fades.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Cindy McCallum said the two nights she spent on the grass opposite the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission were the scariest she’s lived through.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

For two years, Bill Shea lived on the property of Christ the King Episcopal Church. As homeless camps go, it was average. He slept in a field, in a decent bag, and with the blessing of the church's rector. He was surviving — if nothing else.

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