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Picture of Nalea J. Ko

The sun rose over the horizon a few hours before 62-year-old Sung Nguyen stood dockside with tears steadily flowing down his cheeks. The new day brought the same stress of being out of work with few prospects. The Vietnamese American fisherman watched his nearby docked boat, wrapped partially in "Dream Girls" movie posters, as it rocked gently in a Biloxi, Mississippi harbor.

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Wisconsin has one of the highest rate of deaths for African-American newborns in the nation. In a special, three-part series produced by reporter Shamane Mills, the factors behind this devastating trend are examined.

Picture of Caitlan Carroll

Marketplace's Caitlan Caroll and a few members of the staff tried to take the edge off with "downer drinks," non-alcoholic beverages that help you relax and unwind.

Picture of Kevan Carter

This traditional and culturally-linked cuisine remains popular to many but is moving to more healthy dishes and styles.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Get your week rolling with these tidbits from around the web:

Live Now: Forbes' Matthew Herper is blogging the Food and Drug Administration’s Avandia review in real time.

Picture of Sharon Salyer

Pairing English-language and ethnic media to report stories can be rewarding and result in great journalism — but it poses its own challenges. Sharon Salyer and Alejandro Dominguez share what they learned from each other in reporting an award-winning series on Hispanic mental health.

Picture of William Heisel

The Medical Board of California told Orange County Register health reporter Courtney Perkes that it was rare for a doctor to be disciplined, allowed to return to practice and then disciplined again. She wanted to see if that was actually true, and so she asked the board for every record of a doctor who had petitioned for a license reinstatement.

Picture of William Heisel

Courtney Perkes could have phoned it in. She was the fourth reporter to have covered the seemingly never-ending saga of Dr. Andrew Rutland, an obstetrician who, most recently, has been accused of botching an abortion that led to a woman’s death. A story that requires a lot of “the Register reported in 2001” sentences can quickly become an exercise in burnishing boilerplate. But Perkes took a different tack. She used the Rutland case to ask an important question: how often do doctors like Rutland lose their licenses, only to get them back?

Picture of Angilee Shah

When radio reporter Devin Browne began her foray to the edges of journalism, media commentators seized on her project quickly. Her multimedia journal uses prose, images and audio clips to tell a story about how she and a photographer moved into the cramped apartment of an immigrant family in MacArthur Park to learn Spanish. The Entryway, so called for the small space Browne rented, was quickly and harshly criticized for exoticizing Los Angeles' large Latino population.

Picture of William Heisel

Antidote’s posts over the past two weeks about reporting on risk stirred up some great discussion among journalists and scientists about how to best serve readers. Before launching into a new set of statistical concepts, I wanted to pause and share some of the most useful items.

This whole jag about stats was started by a comment Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, the editor of JAMA, made that Vioxx should still be on the market.

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