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No one can ever say Coca-Cola doesn't have chutzpah.

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Experts have advised West Virginia to establish statewide diabetes management programs. Dannie Cunningham can testify that they work.

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Radio journalist Farida Jhabvala examines how one facet of health reform might help uninsured families in Fresno, California's poorest county - but political leaders there don't want to participate.

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Project Unbreakable is a powerful combination of social media, photography and storytelling. But Grace Brown calls it "art therapy" for those who need to heal.

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Goldberg shares the lessons and joys of blogging at CommonHealth.

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What is health? How does it impact my neighborhood? What can we do about it? What is a healthy community?

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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

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Journalists from big name organizations better move over. The notebook or microphone next to you at medical conferences is now likely to be in the hand of someone living with the diagnosis being discussed.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Twitter and Facebook rule our social media lives, but LinkedIn can also be a useful place to find sources and learn about the media organizations we want to work for.

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