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Rhode Island

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Rhode Island doesn’t have enough foster families to meet a growing need. That’s one reason the state's child welfare agency places a higher percentage of kids in group homes than almost any other state. Officials acknowledge the problem, but recruiting new foster families has been tough.

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Rhode Island’s child welfare system is under the microscope. Gov. Gina Raimondo has called for a complete overhaul, saying the Department of Children, Youth, and Families has not only been mismanaged, but has failed the children and families it’s supposed to serve.

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New drugs are about to revolutionize the way we treat- and cure - Hepatitis C. But are we ready to pay for these expensive treatments for the wave of baby boomers who are going to need them?

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Deadlines are fast approaching for this year's National Health Journalism Fellowship, Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism Grant and the inaugural Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health Journalism Fund Grant. Don't miss out on these opportunities.

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Can computer applications make people healthy (and companies profitable)?  The quest is on to develop a game-changer like Farmville.

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States cut back on HIV/AIDS drugs for the poor, Nevada's smoking ban lowers heart attacks and stroke, and a Medicaid success story, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

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I'm on the phone with journalist Mark Johnson and he is rummaging through his desk. He's recently won the Pulitzer Prize and is now sharing his list of health and science references. Last week, Johnson's reporter partner, Kathleen Gallagher, talked to Career GPS about her career be

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William Heisel interviews Michele Simon, public health attorney and author of Appetite for Profit, who wants people to rethink what they are eating and why. She peers through the food industry marketing to see what big packaged food manufacturers and restaurant giants are really selling.

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Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

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Medical boards from coast to coast are inconsistent, inefficient and ill equipped to monitor the hundreds of thousands of doctors licensed under their watch, Antidote’s investigation of every state board has found. There are some standouts, but, overall, they do a terrible job protecting patients and informing the public.

It bears repeating that most doctors do a great job and are focused on one thing: helping their patients heal and lead healthier lives. The mission of this tour was to explore what happens to that minority of doctors who don’t follow the rules.

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Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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