Skip to main content.

rural

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The survey from RAND finds a sizeable drop in awareness from last year's highs.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The bill gained momentum as the pandemic put a spotlight on health care disparities and workforce shortages.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
As the country faces the possibility of massive Medicaid cuts, a pair of experts and an ace Medicaid reporter offered tips on how to navigate the fast-developing story in our latest Health Matters webinar.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

“We expected to find a larger difference between plans on and off the exchange,” said researcher Simon Haeder. “In both cases, it was very unlikely to get an appointment.”

Picture of Alayna Shulman

Reporter Alayna Shulman profiles two women living with mental illness in rural northeast California, where services can be scarce. “You’ve just got to keep going, and you’ve just got to cling to the hope that things are going to get better," one woman says.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

In communities without running water and flush toilets, 11 times more children develop pneumonia than other Alaskans, and some develop complications that can lead to lifelong respiratory problems.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

What if you didn’t have piped water and sewer, and the government wasn’t picking up the tab to extend such resources to you in rural Alaska? How would you go about finding a low-cost system that you could keep running through the winter?

Picture of Alayna Shulman

With high rates of many mental illnesses and not much money to treat them, are the rural counties of far-northern California destined for meager mental health services? What's lacking in these systems, and - perhaps more importantly - how did ones in similar areas overcome the same problems?

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Rural and inner-city health facilities have been dealing with doctor shortages for years. One innovative approach has successfully attracted dedicated health professionals to rural Kansas and Iowa, and urban Memphis, and might provide clues for other communities facing a shortage.

Picture of Cindy Uken

Montana is a vast, frontier state with many small towns scattered in rural counties. A few of those counties don’t have a single doctor or even a pharmacy. For Montanans suffering with mental health issues, those distances can be especially devastating.

Announcements

The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth