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Safety

Picture of Brie Zeltner
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.
Picture of Marina Riker
Day after day, we listened to families’ stories. And we hoped to God that we told them in a way that made others care.
Picture of Barbara Laker
These are some questions and answers about what city, state, and school officials have accomplished in the wake of the Inquirer’s “Toxic City” investigation, and some shortfalls that remain.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
This series was produced as part of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism  Fellowship with a grant from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
Molly is one of the recipients of the 2018 Impact Fund, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism. 
Picture of Bob  Ortega

The funds came after an August 2015 series in The Arizona Republic showed that Latino and Native American children were being disproportionately killed and injured in vehicle accidents across Arizona.

Picture of Angela Hart

In California's Sonoma County, an alarming number of tenants live in housing so run down that it poses a risk to their health and safety. For Karla Orozco's family, the hazards included mold, rats and cockroaches, a broken heater, and sewage backups.

Picture of Bob  Ortega

The Arizona Republic highlights reporter Bob Ortega's investigation into car seat safety, which found a glaring need for more information, particularly in Spanish-speaking communities. But beyond merely reporting the issue, Ortega's series led to a widespread project to boost awareness.

Picture of Bob  Ortega

Roughly four out of five parents don't install car seats correctly, and the results can be disastrous. A new investigative series by The Arizona Republic finds that Hispanic and Native American children were from two times to as much as 10 times likelier not to be properly restrained.

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