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Picture of Shuka Kalantari

An audio postcard from "We Gotta Dance," a social event for developmentally disabled people. The monthly dance is organized by the Arc of San Francisco, a nonprofit resource for people with developmental disabilities.

Picture of Shuka Kalantari

Take a tour of Creativity Explored's studio space, and see artists show off their work. Creativity Explored is an art studio in San Francisco's Mission District, where all the artists are people with developmental disabilities.

 

Picture of Michelle Levander

The Internet and social media have a way of upending professional conventions and giving rise to new models.  As traditional boundaries blur, some unique collaborations have emerged between cutting-edge journalists and public health practitioners. I’ve been fascinating by some of these projects, which have yielded new insights, ground-breaking stories and new ways of connecting with the public. 

Picture of William Heisel

Maryn McKenna has lived inside the "hot zone" for much of her reporting career. She honed her craft at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where she was much admired for her coverage of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It takes skill to persuade any large government agency to give up some of its secrets, but McKenna did just that and turned them into fascinating stories. She has since taken the enviable career path of writing books.

Picture of Shuka Kalantari

See photo and hear San Francisco artist Victor Zaballa tell how he received a kidney transplant, and what it means to him.

Picture of Christina Jewett

This weekend was the second session of the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship conferences in Los Angeles, and the event provided some fascinating and newsy morsels. Here's a round-up of what some of the speakers had to say (Check out more detailed blog items here as well.).

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

HIV/AIDS is an emerging public health problem in the Asian community in the United States. Rong Xiaoqing, a recipient of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, examines its impact for the Chinese-language publication Sing Tao Daily.

Part 2: Cultural tradition traps Chinese elder-abuse victims in U.S.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Even the predawn day began a little differently. The shrill distant stadium cheers of hundreds of Haitian roosters sounded oddly synchronized, as though perhaps they were doing the wave. There were more dogs keeping the beat with incessant, rhythmic barking.

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