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San Francisco

Picture of Barbara Grady

What one journalist learned while reporting on San Francisco's program to provide access to health care for all of its residents.

Picture of Katharine Mieszkowski

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco have quantified just how little physical education students at public elementary schools in the city get. At many schools, kids get far less than the state requires. 

Picture of Victoria  Costello

This was my final post as a blogger for Psychology Today.com. After two years and 110,000 page views, its editors decided my contributions "no longer met their editorial needs." Coincidence? You decide.

Picture of Farida Jhabvala

Radio journalist Farida Jhabvala examines how one facet of health reform might help uninsured families in Fresno, California's poorest county - but political leaders there don't want to participate.

Picture of Joy Horowitz

Recent studies have found statistical links between pesticide use and an outbreak of Parkinson's disease in California farm towns. Researchers even know which chemicals are the likely culprits. What's the government doing about it? Not much.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Lisa Aliferis

The Los Angeles Times examines the apparent failure of the city's much-touted healthier school lunch program, which appears to be a "flop" with students. Journalist Lisa Aliferis says the program may be more successful than anyone realizes.

Picture of Chuleenan Svetvilas

Having the legal right to an abortion does not necessarily mean a woman has access to an abortion - even if there are more than 500 abortion providers in California.

Picture of Jacob Simas

How does environmental degredation correlate with the recent spike in substance abuse (and particularly meth) on the Hoopa reservation? And what is (or isn't) being done about it?

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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