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Most Americans know what's killing us. Stop smoking, eat better, exercise, and wear your seatbelt — just those four simple steps, alone, could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. Here are 10 ways to help people hear that message.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

In one year, 477 people in San Francisco, most of them homeless, used $20 million worth of urgent/emergency services — an average of $42,067 each — and taxpayers paid the bill. Knowing who they are is the first step towards treating their illnesses, injuries, and addictions.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

What happens when someone dies who has no assets – or friends or relatives – to pay for his burial? Procedures for pauper's burials vary widely by jurisdiction. It is one of those little-discussed arenas of public health, a topic that often intersects with the deaths of the homeless.

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Many professions have their version of a post-event analysis of what went wrong, and how to prevent it. The autopsy report is medicine's. Journalists can find a trove of stories in a review of death certificates.

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Why are part-time elected officials in California getting such expensive full-time health benefits? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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The lack of support for breastfeeding in hospitals has a bigger effect on low-income mothers. It is common for hospitals to offer formula for newborn babies or separate them from their mothers at birth, without medical reason. Such practices are considered huge barriers to breastfeeding because they hinder the start.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Every ER has patients like "Sam." The staff call them "frequent fliers" because they patch them up and discharge them, only to watch them return an hour or a day or a week later with another problem.  How much should the health care system spend to help someone who won't help himself? 

 

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Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

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It takes a certain kind of stubbornness and stick-to-it-ness to develop a successful online news site or a popular blog, especially if you are writing about the civic life of your community — not fashion tidbits or celebrity gossip. We are working with these news innovators to expand their health reporting.

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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