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San Joaquin Valley

Picture of Harold Pierce
An invisible disease has been killing middle-aged white people in the San Joaquin Valley at higher rates than ever before. One doctor calls them "deaths of despair."
Picture of Harold Pierce
Valley fever is a fungal respiratory infection that is a constant health threat in vast stretches of the San Joaquin valley. 
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Community violence and a visit to the doctor might seem unrelated. But for people living in violent communities, and the police who patrol them, it's often more closely related than people think.
Picture of Hannah Esqueda

Obamacare enabled a wave of residents in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley to get health insurance, but finding doctors has been a recurring challenge for many. Is there any relief on the horizon?

Picture of Diana Aguilera

Fresno County, home to nearly a million people, has some of the highest STD rates in California. The problem is urgent, but it's not an easy story to report. KVPR's Diana Aguilera tells how she was able to gain access to the communities most impacted by STD outbreaks.

Picture of Andrea Castillo

As wells ran dry in the drought-stricken Central Valley this summer, a public health crisis went less noticed. The Fresno Bee's Andrea Castillo decided to focus her reporting on East Porterville, where nearly half the town's 7,500 people have dry wells.

Picture of Andrea Castillo

This story is the first in an occasional series about the drought’s effects on health. Andrea Castillo’s reporting was undertaken for the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.

Picture of Andrea Castillo

My project will compare the health status of Valley Latinos living in a handful of urban communities to those living in rural towns.

Picture of Diana Aguilera

Most people wouldn’t think of the San Joaquin Valley - California’s agricultural heartland - as a hotbed for sexually transmitted infections. But the agriculturally rich yet impoverished region has a significant and growing HIV/AIDS problem that’s troubling local health officials.

Picture of Maria Ortiz-Briones

In a region hobbled by the country's worst air pollution, high obesity rates, and lack of culturally sensitive doctors, Vida en el Valle will take a look at what immediate impacts the Affordable Care Act will have in the San Joaquin Valley.

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