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San Joaquin Valley

Picture of Ezra David  Romero

Central California wasn't always the mecca of U.S. agriculture. Historically millions of acres of wetlands shrouded the region, but river diversion for irrigation dried all but five percent of the rivers and streams in the area. We question whether a change in waterways will impact community health.

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Community members are invited to attend Valley Fever Research Day Saturday at the UCSF Fresno Center for Medical Education and Research. The event is an opportunity for researchers to connect with community members who have been impacted by the fungal disease.

Picture of Julia Mitric

By her junior year, Unyque Jackson found herself at McNair High School in Stockton, California. After being moved in and out of at least 10 schools since elementary school, she still had one more transfer. Unyque was pregnant and questioned whether she would be able to graduate.

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Strong patient advocacy raised the profile of breast cancer and HIV/AIDS. What lessons can those involved in the fight against valley fever learn from other, more high profile diseases?

Picture of Tara Lohan

Beneath the farms, orchards and vineyards of Central and Southern California lies a prehistoric soup worth a fortune. But new ways of extracting oil and gas have come with reports of air and water pollutions, as well as risks to public and environmental health. This has many in California concerned.

Picture of Liza Gross

Where you live—and who you are—plays a big part in how long you’ll live. If you live in poverty in California’s San Joaquin Valley, and you're Latino, you’re twice as likely to die prematurely as someone who is white and lives in an upper-class community.

Picture of William Heisel

The struggles of some California prisoners with valley fever have largely remained hidden from the public until now as the state prison system has to move at-risk inmates from facilities where valley fever is endemic.

Picture of William Heisel

Most of the people who contract valley fever live in California or in Arizona. But concerns about the disease are starting to spread -- with journalists reporting on it from other parts of the country.

Picture of William Heisel

The Reporting on Health Collaborative heard earlier this week that Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, was going to meet with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and then issue a statement. Is that itself worth a story?

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Congressman Kevin McCarthy (R-California) seeks to get funding for valley fever vaccine research and is working with the CDC to get a clinical trial to determine best treatment for the disease.

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