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San Joaquin Valley

Picture of Catherine Stifter

Why is the high school dropout rate in the San Joaquin Valley among the highest in the California? CapRadio will produce a documentary that tells stories of youth and adults touched by the dropout crisis with accuracy, depth, nuance and respect.

Picture of Tara Lohan

Drilling for oil and gas using high volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" may soon be a source of controversy in California. As a 2013 California Endowment Health Journalism Fellow, I'll examine what the potential health risks are and how state agencies plan to regulate the industry.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Veteran environmental reporter recommends starting by reporting the basic story first - focusing on what the problem appears to be, and how authorities and businesses are responding.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

During the month of April, Vida en el Valle ran a four-part series - called Latinos Protecting La Tierra – about environmental advocates from across the state. Why did we focus on the people fighting the environmental battles, rather than the issue itself?

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Although California is the world’s 9th largest economy and a hub of tech innovation, some of the state’s residents live in communities that lack basic services ­like clean water and functioning sewage systems.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Nearly every day, Arleen Hernandez battles an aging septic tank that backs up into her toilet and shower. Upon moving to Parklawn in 1986, she didn’t realize her new neighborhood lacks basic public services.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Does rural healthcare have a future? And how can we ensure that rural California residents have access to decent healthcare, as doctors are becoming scarce?

Picture of Heather Somerville

Stress has always been a part of college life – moving away from home, living with roommates and cramming for tests. But college counselors are worried as new and serious stressors, many financial are hurting students' health and hindering their academic success.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

About three years ago, Georgina González left her three siblings, three children, and three grandchildren in Puebla, México and immigrated to Fresno in search of better economic opportunities.
What she found here, though, was an opportunity to receive health care after she was diagnosed with breast

Picture of Hillary Meeks

When my 2-year-old son has to see a doctor for his eyes or ears, I plan to take at least a half a day off work, if not a full day. Between the hours-long wait in the overcrowded specialists’ offices and the time it takes to travel to another county, our time is eaten away because these doctors are so few and far between in the San Joaquin Valley. That’s the mantra of Tulare County and health care. There aren’t enough doctors to go around, specialist or otherwise.

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COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

In our next webinar, we’ll analyze Biden’s COVID-19 strategy in the first 100 days — and the huge obstacles the new federal effort must confront. We’ll also look at how Biden plans to address the economic devastation wrought by the pandemic, with a focus on women and vulnerable families. Sign-up here!

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