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schizophrenia

Picture of Emily DePrang

In 2003, Texas decided only to treat three mental health diagnoses: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. Everyone else—and everyone who suffered from these but was misdiagnosed or undiagnosed—became ineligible for community-based health services.

Picture of Jocelyn Wiener

As mental health budgets shrink and services erode in Stanislaus County California, Aspen Family Medical Group, a primary care clinic, has taken on a key role in treating the county's uninsured mentally ill.

Picture of Erica Mu

"Inside Out" is a public radio series that will begin a conversation about the mental health of Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). These radio and multimedia stories examine the experience and understanding of mental health from the perspective of several Bay Area residents of differing AAPI ethnicities. They reveal barriers to care, like...

Picture of Victoria  Costello

An opinion piece, borne of personal experience and a decade of mental health reporting, arguing in favor of many proposed changes to the DSM-5 that would allow early intervention for common mental disorders.

Picture of Victoria  Costello

This was my final post as a blogger for Psychology Today.com. After two years and 110,000 page views, its editors decided my contributions "no longer met their editorial needs." Coincidence? You decide.

Picture of William Heisel

Did a Los Angeles hospital dump a schizophrenic patient onto Skid Row, as his wife claims? Or did the hospital merely "drop him off" at a halfway house?

Picture of Victoria  Costello

How do you meld science reporting with a memoir of mental illness? Author and journalist Victoria Costello explores how and why she wrote her new book, "A Lethal Inheritance."

Picture of Ryan White

In the richest county in California lies a motley assemblage of residents living aboard a flotilla of weather-worn boats in a narrow bay sandwiched between Sausalito and Tiburon.

Picture of Damien Newton

At the first meeting of my fellow fellows, we were asked a simple question, "do you consider yourself a journalist?" My answer at the time was, "no." My answer today would be different.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Journalist-blogger Isabelle Walker provides an in-depth look at what happens to homeless people who get seriously ill. Where can they go to recover?

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