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Picture of Madeline Ostrander

Four decades after the passage of the Clean Water Act, regulators haven’t kept up with the pollution pressure that growing populations put on America’s shorelines. And that has major implications for the health of those communities who depend on these ecosystems.

Picture of Collin Tong

Village Health Works has rebuilt a war-torn Burundian village, teaching community members who used to kill each other to instead care for one another. Seattle's global health community is on board.

Picture of Linda Marsa

In 2010, when I started researching the health effects of climate change for my book, Fevered, it seemed like this looming threat wasn’t on the nation’s radar screens. I was pessimistic that changes could be made in time to avert catastrophe. But as I drilled down, I was pleasantly surprised to disc

Picture of William Heisel

Parents whose children regularly play at Magnuson Park in Seattle are concerned about cumulative radiation exposure. Free floating radium could quickly expose a child who frequents the park to the maximum yearly limit of 500 millirems above background levels.

Picture of William Heisel

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission estimates that the typical American is exposed to about 300 millirems per year of radiation from natural background sources. Every year, it’s as if you are undergoing 30 dental X-rays without ever setting foot in a dentist’s office.

Picture of William Heisel

To understand the nature of a threat like buried radiation in a park, it helps to pause for a minute and think about the sacred values of the people feeling threatened. Part of the threat is psychological and should not be dismissed.

Picture of Collin Tong

We may have plenty of clean water for our own needs, but if anything that has only spurred more interest in helping the rest of the world.

Picture of Collin Tong

A coalition of local and global health groups have banded together to bring the lessons they've learned in developing countries to south King County, where the health index is as bad as Nairobi.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

Though it is clear that South Los Angeles is park poor compared to rest of Los Angeles County, current fiscal problems lend people to dismiss the idea of spending more money creating parks, adding trees or fixing sidewalks. Turns out that maybe Los Angeles can’t afford not to invest in more nature.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Ron Shinkman has worked many gigs in his career, but none perhaps as eye-opening as his experience covering the medical marijuana industry in Southern California. Here's our Q&A with the veteran health business journalist.

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More than 100 anti-transgender rights bills were introduced in state legislatures this year. Many focus on children and teens. Join us for our next Health Matters webinar, where we'll explore the health and well-being of transgender youth as states such as Arkansas and Tennessee seek to limit their rights. Our expert panel will share the latest research, seed story ideas and offer reporting advice. Sign-up here!

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