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sickle cell

Picture of Farah Yousry
The exact number of sickle cell patients in the U.S. is unknown, because data on the genetic disorder is lacking.
Picture of Farah Yousry
Health interventions have made it possible for people with sickle cell in the U.S. to live well into adulthood. But the transition out of pediatric care comes with many challenges.
Picture of Momo Chang
While the genetic disease received widespread attention during the Civil Rights Movement, researchers and doctors say patients continue to suffer from a lack of adequate treatment.
Picture of Sheree Crute

Medical breakthroughs in curing sickle-cell anemia and treating HIV/AIDS and prostate cancer may dramatically improve life for the millions of people struggling with these diseases, but there are significant barriers that may keep African Americans from receiving this advanced care.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

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Air Quality: Here’s one instance where wealth isn’t linked to health: ScienceDaily reports on a study finding that homes in both poor and affluent California communities had similarly high levels of endocrine disruptors. These disruptors can affect the endocrine system and lead to fertility and infant development problems among other health risks.

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