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Victims of bad physician behavior everywhere are rubbing their eyes in disbelief today after Dr. Conrad Murray's conviction in the death of Michael Jackson. Here are five lessons from the case for regulatory agencies, prosecutors, patient advocates and journalists.

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The doctor did it. In the bedroom. With an an anesthetic.

The Los Angeles County Coroner spent 51 pages of minute calculations and detailed examinations to come to that simple conclusion on Aug. 24, 2009. Jackson had died from a lethal dose of propofol and other drugs and the death was a homicide.

This was perhaps the most surprising thing about the Michael Jackson case, because coroners are so reluctant to say a physician killed someone.

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Here’s where you have to pity Dr. Conrad Murray, regardless of whether you think he’s guilty.

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Dr. Conrad Murray made his first mistake when he signed on to be Michael Jackson’s personal physician.

Perhaps the task was doomed for any doctor, but Murray was particularly ill equipped to deal with the King of Pop’s concoction of quirks and cravings. Murray was operating well outside of

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Antidote started as a way to share innovative investigative ideas in health reporting, in part by highlighting reporters who have done an exceptional job digging for great stories. Starting this week I am going to list 10 of my favorite stories from the year, in no particular order.

Smart Choices Foods: Dumb as they look? ,” Rebecca Ruiz, Forbes, October 2009

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Let's assume that Dr. Conrad Murray did not kill Michael Jackson.

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In a fascinating piece in the New York Times, Natasha Singer detailed how Dr. Gloria Bachmann leapt at the chance to sign her name to an article she had not written.

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Eleven million Americans have eating disorders. Here are tips on covering this complex disease from a veteran journalist who faced the issue in her own family.

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Dr. Marjorie Kagawa-Singer is a professor at the UCLA School of Public Health and Department of Asian American Studies. Her clinical work and research have been in oncology, focusing upon the disparities in physical and mental health care outcomes of ethnic minority populations with cancer -- primarily with the Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities.

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