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Socioeconomics

Picture of Susan  Abram

Hospitals around the country have been increasingly using homeless navigators to help place indigent men and women into treatments centers or housing after discharge, including this first-of-its-kind, two-year-old pilot program from Kaiser Permanente.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

In Michigan, companies have begun to recover, businesses are hiring and the economy is humming again. But recovery has remained elusive for many families whose struggles have been exacerbated by severe cuts to social safety nets, education and social programs.

Picture of Susan  Abram

Outreach workers from health clinics have spent the last three years in search of 390,000 Los Angeles County residents who are uninsured and can qualify for free health insurance.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Isabelle Walker's fellowship project put the spotlight on lack of respite care for community's neediest.

Picture of Ryan White

In the richest county in California lies a motley assemblage of residents living aboard a flotilla of weather-worn boats in a narrow bay sandwiched between Sausalito and Tiburon.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

The realm of AIDS/HIV and its prevalence in the African-American community is not one that has gone untouched, yet the problem continues to get worse. A new CEHJF Fellow describes her upcoming reporting project.

Picture of Damien Newton

At the first meeting of my fellow fellows, we were asked a simple question, "do you consider yourself a journalist?" My answer at the time was, "no." My answer today would be different.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Journalist-blogger Isabelle Walker provides an in-depth look at what happens to homeless people who get seriously ill. Where can they go to recover?

Picture of Kristen Natividad

Featured this week is an opportunity for a health communications professional with experience in writing for the over-65 demographic. Also, we list the most updated information on upcoming grants, fellowships and educational opportunities.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

As patient satisfaction surveys become more important to how doctors get paid, Doc Gurley finds them to be easily gamed and lacking in statistical validity — creating problems for both doctors and their patients.

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Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

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