Skip to main content.

statistics

Picture of William Heisel

Reporters sometimes treat medicine as if newer is always better. It's not. Here's how to accurately report on the potential harms of a new treatment.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

It’s always good to get a statistics refresher if you cover any kind of health research. Erika Franklin Fowler, an assistant professor of government at Wesleyan University, offered some tips on Saturday to California Endowment Health Journalism Fellows gathered for a seminar in Los Angeles. (Click here for her complete presentation.)

Here are some basic questions Fowler suggests journalists should ask before diving in to cover a medical study:

Picture of DVera Cohn

There’s hardly a health story out there that cannot benefit from some good data – from estimates of the number of elderly Americans to hospital quality ratings for your community.

This article will help you find useful databases and offer guidance on how to use them accurately. The first pa

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth