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Picture of Maria Sosa
"As fellow news junkies, we talked about the increasing number of cases we reported on a daily basis about women dying from cosmetic surgeries in Florida, and people who were arrested for not being actual doctors."
Picture of Jenna Flannigan

Medicare levies penalties against hospitals in an effort to reduce the number of infections patients pick up at these facilities.

Picture of William Heisel

While he was on probation for failing to have a surgeon handle a patient's bowel repairs, Dr. John Perry continued his dangerous ways -- this time with a cancer patient who should have seen an oncologist.

Picture of William Heisel

The records of a doctor in Washington State with a history of injuring patients during surgery will vanish from public review, if legislation under consideration gets passed.

Picture of William Heisel

What Louisa Benitez saw in the hospital ahead of her son's heart surgery heightened her anxiety about the procedure and his risk for infection. Nurses and doctors were walking in and out in their surgical scrubs. Getting coffee. Sitting down with a magazine and eating a sandwich.

Picture of William Heisel

Unlike hip and knee replacements, pacemakers generally come with warranties. While this might relieve you if you have device problems, companies can still argue about what a warranty covers and patients can end up in court.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

Dr. Julie Park, a plastic surgeon specializing in breast reconstruction following cancer surgery, worries too many women rashly decide to remove both breasts. This trend now includes women, like actress Angelina Jolie, who haven't even been diagnosed, but are genetically predisposed to the disease.

Picture of William Heisel

It’s almost unthinkable. A doctor cutting open patients, fiddling around just enough to make it seem like a surgery is happening, and then sewing them back up without addressing the problem. This isn’t a placebo surgery experiment.

Picture of William Heisel

The two cases involving the University of Kentucky challenge the heart of public records and free speech, and they could help define how courts interpret the still mostly untested federal Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005.

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