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Technology

Picture of Luanne Rife
Flossie Horace said she would have been too nervous to care for her grandson without the seemingly simple-looking equipment that allowed her grandson’s nursery to become a sophisticated communication center linked with doctors at the University of Virginia.
Picture of Luanne Rife
Last year, the University of Virginia marked its 1,000th telestroke consultation in its first three years. Thirty-five to 40 patients a month in rural hospitals benefit from specialty care that they wouldn’t otherwise have had.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
This story follows up on a series of articles that explained how food access issues arise and how the Louisville community is pursuing long-term change.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
New tech devices can help parents make sure they're talking to their kids enough. Such conversations drive healthy brain development and help kids keep up with their peers at school.
Picture of Monya De
A number of startups and older companies are developing new apps and services that aim to make patient check-in and gathering medical histories faster and easier.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
The technology isn’t a panacea for all that ails rural health care today. Some areas still lack the required internet connectivity, and critics say telemedicine doesn't enrich a local economy in the way a hospital does, providing jobs and other community goods.
Picture of Paul Sisson

In 2012, a surgical team mistakenly removed Paul Kibbett’s healthy left kidney rather than the cancerous tumor on the right side. Since then, the hospital has worked to build a culture where reporting mistakes is celebrated.

Picture of Monya De

New online communities are offering patients support and guidance to an extent not previously possible. That can be a huge boon for colon cancer patients, who might otherwise find themselves isolated and afraid.

Picture of Monya De

While innovation will spur many changes in health care, current trends may also create unwelcome developments. Dr. Monya De offers her first five of 10 predictions on what medicine will look like in the decades to come.

Picture of Laura Ungar

From telemedicine to transportation assistance to culturally appropriate care, panelists at the 2016 California Fellowship discuss strategies new and old for getting care to the state’s underserved communities.

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