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Mental health experts assumed that people of all races had the same risk factors for self-harm. Emerging evidence suggests that is not the case.
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This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.
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Early in her career, Dr. Barbara Staggers was strongly censured for hugging a patient. Now, it’s part of her daily routine, a way to show kids who might not otherwise have any positive physical affection in their lives that someone cares about them.

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On January 1, California will begin transitioning children from the Healthy Families Program, a low-cost health insurance program for kids and teens, into Medi-Cal, the state’s version of Medicaid.

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Donovan Patterson was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 14 years old. The only time the thought of beind stuck with diabetes for the rest of his life leaves his mind is when he's playing music.

 

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Benji was 16 years old and 270 pounds when he decided he needed to loose weight if he wanted to be a firefighter when he grew up.

Since then, with the encouragement of his community, he has been able to run off 100 pounds. 

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Although teen suicide attempts have declined gradually since the 1990s, death by suicide has risen 8 percent among teenagers, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it’s the third leading cause of death for teens between the ages of 15 and 19. While each suicide is a unique story, there is a common thread: More than 90 percent of teens who kill themselves show signs of major depression or another mental illness in the year prior to their deaths.

Picture of Jennifer Biddle

Although teen suicide attempts have declined gradually since the 1990s, death by suicide has risen 8 percent among teenagers, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it’s the third leading cause of death for teens between the ages of 15 and 19. While each suicide is a unique story, there is a common thread: More than 90 percent of teens who kill themselves show signs of major depression or another mental illness in the year prior to their deaths.

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In the space of eight months, five teenagers committed suicides by throwing themselves in front of trains in the California town of Palo Alto.

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