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Within hours of the news breaking about Michael Jackson's death, attention started to turn toward one of the only eyewitnesses to the event: his personal physician.

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When choosing doctors, people like to know the answers to a few basic questions.

"Do they have the right amount of experience?"

"Are they conveniently located?"

"Do they accept my insurance?"

Somewhere above, "Do they stock Popular Mechanics in the lobby?" and below "Did they go to medical school?" might be these questions:

"Do they abuse drugs?"

"Are they honest?"

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Matthew William Wasserman of Katy, Texas, found a unique way to treat a female patient's back: "a sensory examination of the genital area."

That was according to the Texas Medical Board.

Now, Wasserman had only been out of medical residency for three years when this happened, and he did not have a lot of women in his graduating class at Baylor Medical College. Still, one has to assume that most doctors know the basics of anatomy, male or female.

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Public health officials are increasingly concerned about a possible pandemic amid reports of hundreds of new cases of swine flu in Mexico that have killed up to 60 people. Eight swine flu cases have been reported in the United States, in California and Texas. Mexican authorities are taking drastic measures to contain the swine flu outbreak, closing schools and universities in Mexico City.

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Pete Delgado is currently the Chief Executive Officer for the Los Angeles County- University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Healthcare Network. He is responsible for directing the leadership and operations of all health service programs for LAC-USC
Healthcare Network including the Medical center, the tertiary care hub of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services and the primary teaching facility of the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. As a seasoned healthcare executive, Mr.

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Paul T. Giboney, M.D., is associate medical director of Clinica Msr. Oscar A. Romero, a non-profit community health center in Los Angeles that serves about 50,000 patients a year, most of them uninsured or underinsured. Dr. Giboney has been involved in inner city medicine for 14 years and has worked at Clinica Romero for six years. In addition to his medical practice, Dr. Giboney has been extensively involved with several quality improvement efforts at Clinica Romero and in collaborative work with community and public partners. Dr.

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Murray Penner is the Deputy Executive Director of Domestic Programs at the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD). Penner's primary responsibilities include oversight of the Care and Treatment, Prevention, Viral Hepatitis and Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities programs, including oversight of cooperative agreements with HRSA, CDC and the Office of Minority Health (OMH). Penner also oversees overall responsibility for NASTAD's National ADAP Monitoring and Technical Assistance program, which includes production of the National ADAP Report.

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Dr. Myers is the former Director for the Department of Health and Human Service's National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and has an appointment at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) as the Sealy Center for Vaccine Development's (SCVD) Associate Director for Public Health Policy and Education. Vaccine policy issues that Dr. Myers and the SCVD address are assessing the safety and benefits of new and experimental vaccines and barriers that keep people from getting the vaccines they need.

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David C. Warner is the Wilbur J. Cohen Fellow in Health and Social Policy at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and a professor of public affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He also is a visiting professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. His major teaching and research interests are in economics, health policy and health finance. He formerly taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was deputy director of the Office of Program Analysis of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

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As the fastest growing ethnic population in the United States, Latinos have a major impact on the health care system. Nearly one in three Americans will be Latino by 2050, according to an August 2008 estimate by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Latino population is expected to nearly triple from 46.7 million in 2008 to 132.8 million in 2050. As a percentage of the overall U.S. population, Latinos will more than double from 15 to 30 percent.

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