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trauma

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
How journalists of color can practice self-care, stay safe and advocate for fair coverage in their newsrooms.
Picture of Christopher Walljasper
Finding a fixer to connect with reluctant sources was the first step.
Picture of Issac Bailey
"My grief and frustration over JJ’s fate were compounded by all I learned about the effects of toxic stress on a developing brain."
Picture of Christopher Walljasper
The raid at MPC enterprises is part of a trend of increasing worksite raids, according to a Midwest Center analysis of federal data and interviews with immigration officials.
Picture of Adia White
This story was produced as a project for the 2019 California Fellowship, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Adia White
Dena Kapsalis, director of student services at Paradise Unified School District, was surprised at first by how many students chose to return after the Camp Fire destroyed the town.
Picture of Adia White
“I have kids telling me still, oh Ms. Henry I lost my stuffed animals that were in the garage and I know that they burned in there and it makes me very sad,” she said. “You know, those little things were people to them.”
Picture of Giles Bruce
Prevention is always king, but what does the evidence say about the best way to treat kids who have already suffered abuse?
Picture of Kate  Wallis
As women and mothers, we are astonished at the reported conditions. But as pediatricians, we are deeply concerned about the long-term health impacts of these kids are likely to face.
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
How do you know when someone is ready to be interviewed about a trauma she has endured? And what do you do if she wants to back out just before publication?

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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