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trauma

Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
At each turn, the people responsible for her safety failed her — her birth parents, relatives, foster parents, the Indiana Department of Child Services, school officials, therapists and others.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona tends to try out new approaches and programs, but rarely sticks with such efforts long enough to bring about change.
Picture of Cary Aspinwall
In Oklahoma, ranked No. 1 for per capita female incarceration, kids were going missing from school because their mothers were locked up in county jail. "This was the most complicated story I’ve ever done," writes 2016 National Fellow Cary Aspinwall.
Picture of Melissa  Noel
The Carribean children left behind after parents migrate can suffer from depression, low self-esteem and feelings of abandonment. Such feelings can lead to problems in school and leave kids vulnerable to abuse.
Picture of Debra Krol
In Indian Country, generational poverty, poor schools and a lack of health care all contribute to chronically high rates of stress during childhood.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
From meditation to soccer to art therapy, public schools in California are finding ways to help undocumented students navigate their emotions as they face new immigration policies.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
This article was produced as a project of the USC Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.
Picture of Eve Troeh
Many New Orleans children come from tough backgrounds and have been thrust into a new school system that’s pushing hard to fast-track achievement.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
Maps of the modern plagues of health disparities — rural hospital closings, medical provider shortages, poor education outcomes, poverty and mortality — all glow along this Southern corridor.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Data allowed reporter Kathleen McGrory to show gun accidents involving children were a growing problem in Florida. But it was the story of one family that really made the difference.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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