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trauma

Picture of Lucy Guanuna
The burst of media coverage on the surge of unaccompanied minors coming to the U.S. in recent years has since ebbed, but the migration continues and many of the children’s basic needs still go unmet.
Picture of Ryan Burns
“Who has seen a behavioral counselor?” Roughly half of the kids at the Yurok Tribe's youth wellness event stepped forward. “Who has suffered from depression or anxiety?” Three-quarters of the kids came forward.
Picture of Angela Naso
Angela Maria Naso wrote this story while participating in the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
Stress, depression and anxiety have ballooned among undocumented students at the UC Berkeley this election season, reports Univision's Jenny Manrique.
Picture of Angela Naso
Luis Nolasco, 25, did not know what the psychological consequences would be when he came from Mexico with his family, illegally, at the age of nine. Then, in his late teens, he noticed he began to feel sad and pessimistic.
Picture of Liza Gross
At California’s state psychiatric hospitals, ongoing assaults on staff by patients can make it nearly impossible to provide a therapeutic environment.
Picture of William Heisel
Football fan culture is changing, writes contributing editor William Heisel, as the consequences of repeated hard collisions become common knowledge. "Knock his block off!" the old refrain went. Or maybe don't?
Picture of Matt Guilhem
A reporter who was on the scene shortly after the terror attack in San Bernardino follows up with the victims and first responders over the following year to understand how the event impacted their mental health.
Picture of Deepa Bharath
Zuher Belal put a black pencil on the rectangular piece of paper stretched out on a table. The 21-year-old native of Syria drew a Muslim man with arms outstretched in prayer. Then, he drew an airplane dropping a bomb.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
“I call it present traumatic stress disorder. When you have post-traumatic stress disorder it means the trauma has ended. With our people it is a perpetual trauma that is inflicted on almost a daily basis,” one lifelong resident of Bakersfield says.

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