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trauma

Picture of Mallory  Falk
In New Orleans, children screen positive for post-traumatic stress disorder at three times the national average. WWNO’s Mallory Falk and Eve Troeh explore how the city’s education reforms after Katrina have made it harder for some students to recover from trauma, and to learn.
Picture of Anna Challet
Childhood trauma and adversity have been big buzz phrases in recent years. But are they really just proxy terms for poverty? How one journalist came to rethink her own assumptions in reporting on mental health.
Picture of Lucy Guanuna
The burst of media coverage on the surge of unaccompanied minors coming to the U.S. in recent years has since ebbed, but the migration continues and many of the children’s basic needs still go unmet.
Picture of Ryan Burns
“Who has seen a behavioral counselor?” Roughly half of the kids at the Yurok Tribe's youth wellness event stepped forward. “Who has suffered from depression or anxiety?” Three-quarters of the kids came forward.
Picture of Angela Naso
Angela Maria Naso wrote this story while participating in the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
Stress, depression and anxiety have ballooned among undocumented students at the UC Berkeley this election season, reports Univision's Jenny Manrique.
Picture of Angela Naso
Luis Nolasco, 25, did not know what the psychological consequences would be when he came from Mexico with his family, illegally, at the age of nine. Then, in his late teens, he noticed he began to feel sad and pessimistic.
Picture of Liza Gross
At California’s state psychiatric hospitals, ongoing assaults on staff by patients can make it nearly impossible to provide a therapeutic environment.
Picture of William Heisel
Football fan culture is changing, writes contributing editor William Heisel, as the consequences of repeated hard collisions become common knowledge. "Knock his block off!" the old refrain went. Or maybe don't?
Picture of Matt Guilhem
A reporter who was on the scene shortly after the terror attack in San Bernardino follows up with the victims and first responders over the following year to understand how the event impacted their mental health.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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