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Picture of Anna Challet
“Perhaps the biggest deficit in our clients’ lives is a lack of two things – it’s a lack of community and it’s a lack of self-esteem,” says Rob Gitin, who works with vulnerable youth in San Francisco.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Valley Public Radio in California's Central Valley reports on what law enforcement agencies in the valley say they are doing to help police officers cope with the mental strain of a violent line of work.
Picture of William Heisel
Despite their benefits, the use of sensors has stalled amid concerns that inaccurate readings could lead to sidelined players. Some worry games or even careers could be cut short by false positives. But is that a valid objection?
Picture of Angela Naso
Three out of four adults of Mexican origin who experience a mental illness will not seek professional help, and the problem of under utilization is even higher among Mexican immigrants.
Picture of William Heisel
Last week, Carolina Panthers’ quarterback Cam Newton got a ton of ink for what were perceived as repeated concussion-threatening hits to the helmet. Why did this story get so much attention?
Picture of Chinyere Amobi

Dr. Glenda Wrenn of Morehouse School of Medicine discusses narratives of recovery and how journalists can do justice to the concept of resilience in their reporting.

Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Community violence and a visit to the doctor might seem unrelated. But for people living in violent communities, and the police who patrol them, it's often more closely related than people think.
Picture of Deepa Bharath
“The word we use for mental illness in Vietnamese is ‘crazy,’” Lanie Tran said. “If you’re a Buddhist, you believe you or your family members did something wrong in a previous birth. If you’re Catholic, you believe God is punishing you for something you did that was mean or wrong.”
Picture of Julie Small
Two reporters set out to answer a question: Was the horrific death of a mentally ill inmate in a California jail an anomaly or evidence of systemic deficiencies that could lead to more deaths?
Picture of Matt Guilhem
Concluding his series on mental health in the wake of the San Bernardino terror attack, KVCR's Matt Guilhem looks at how area Muslims process the scrutiny they receive.

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