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Picture of Natalie  Shure
Since he lost his housing and began living on the streets in 2010, Theo Henderson has found it challenging to manage his Type 2 diabetes. Having so little control over his environment, it’s extremely difficult to follow any sort of routine, which is something diabetes patients say is key in helping
Picture of Ross Terrell
Georgia’s APEX program is entering its fifth year. It’s the state’s attempt to increase mental health services in both private and public schools. ...
Picture of Jason Kandel
In one incident, a girl with a mental health diagnosis was pepper-sprayed in the groin, then left to use toilet water to relieve her pain.
Picture of Adia White
“I have kids telling me still, oh Ms. Henry I lost my stuffed animals that were in the garage and I know that they burned in there and it makes me very sad,” she said. “You know, those little things were people to them.”
Picture of Giles Bruce
Prevention is always king, but what does the evidence say about the best way to treat kids who have already suffered abuse?
Picture of Nuala Sawyer
For many unhoused people living on San Francisco streets, maintaining good physical health is fairly low on a long daily to-do list. Basic survival — finding water, food, and shelter — can occupy much of one’s day and energy.
Picture of William Heisel
When stories make bold claims about life expectancies chopped by decades or rates of chronic diseases skyrocketing for those with higher scores, they can create heightened anxiety without a real solution.
Picture of Nicole Knight
When I set out to explore disparities in sexually transmitted diseases, I noticed few outlets elevated the voices and stories of individuals most affected by STDs. Then I lost my job.

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This month marks the sober anniversary of the police killing of George Floyd, which ignited global protests and renewed efforts to reform or dismantle policing. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the price society pays for a criminal-legal system that disproportionately arrests, punishes and kills Black people. And we’ll look at how reporters can best cover this evolving story in original and powerful ways. Sign-up here!

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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